Happy Mother’s Day to our newest moms!

May 8, 2015  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

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Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms out there! We would like to highlight our newest moms, three of our wonderful staff members who are currently expecting!

photo 4Sherry Nelson, North Florida Health Corps Program Coordinator

Due: November 2015

  • What is one infant safety practice that you plan to use that you have learned by working at the Coalition? The ABCs of Safe Sleep!!
  • How do you take care of yourself while being pregnant? I go on a lot of walks and plan to enroll in prenatal yoga classes.
  • Is there one bit of wisdom about parenting that you plan on using that you received from your mother, a friend, or relative? Oh Man! I’ve heard so much since I found out I was pregnant so its hard to choose ONE thing. I guess it would have to be to make sure I spend quality time with my child.

photo 2April Cook, MomCare Advisor

Due: June 2015

  • What is one infant safety practice that you plan to use that you have learned by working at the Coalition? One infant safety practice that I plan to implement with my baby is Back to sleep is best.
  • How do you take care of yourself while being pregnant? While being pregnant, I take care of myself and my baby by taking a raw all natural prenatal Vitamin. It gives me energy as well as supplements the baby with additional nutrients.
  • Is there one bit of wisdom about parenting that you plan on using that you received from your mother, a friend, or relative? I plan on working hard to becoming a better person mentally and physically so I can enjoy my baby to the fullest. Pregnancy can be very taxing and draining on the female body, restoring my postbaby body to better than my prebaby body is a goal!

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Artillia Sampson, Administrative Assistant

Due: May 2015

  • What is one infant safety practice that you plan to use that you have learned by working at the Coalition? The safety practice that I learned while working at the Coalition is coping with crying. All babies cry and it is ok to become frustrated as long as you deal with it properly. It does not mean that you as a parent is doing anything wrong.
  • How do you take care of yourself while being pregnant? During my pregnancy I attended all of my prenatal visits and took my vitamins. I also consulted with my doctor when ever I felt uncomfortable and needed advice.
  • Is there one bit of wisdom about parenting that you plan on using that you received from your mother, a friend, or relative?  The one bit of wisdom I plan on using was given to me by my mother. She encourages me that babies do not come with instructions and in their eyes we are perfect even if we put on their diaper backwards.

Women’s Health Week 2015

  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

NWHW_Activities_2015On the heels of Mother’s Day, women’s health takes top priority across the country from May 10-16 for National Women’s Health Week. Locally, the Magnolia Project has a week full of activities to celebrate women and encourage good health.

The national effort is organized by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Office of Women’s Health. The goal is to empower women to make their health a priority and help women understand what steps they can take to improve their health.

Magnolia, a special federally-funded Healthy Start initiative to improve the health and well-being of women during their childbearing years (15–44 years old) in Jacksonville’s Health Zone 1, will be holding the following activities:

  • May 11: Community & Project Participants’ Appreciation Day, 11am-2pm
  • May 12: Mental Wellness & Beauty, 9am-3pm
  • May 13: Healthy Eating, 10am-1:30pm
  • May 14: Open House (11am-2pm) & Health Screenings (8:30am-4pm)

All activities will take place at the Magnolia Project, 5300 N. Pearl St., Jacksonville, FL 32208. For more information, contact 904.353.2130 x1005.

National Nurses Week: Sarah Ortiz, Nursing Student

  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

In honor of National Nurses Week (May 6-12), join us in celebrating the many wonderful and invaluable nurses who work with and impact our programs!

Americorps 437Meet Sarah

Sarah shares how she became a nurse after serving in the North Florida Health Corps, a program that provides its members the opportunity to gain hands on professional experience in a supportive environment while serving the North Florida community through a variety of program components.

Since completing her AmeriCorps term with Baptist Health’s Department of Community Health in November 2014, Sarah was accepted to nursing programs at both the University of North Florida and University of Central Florida. She credits the North Florida Health Corps program with giving her the confidence to finally apply for nursing school and helping her choose UNF.

“I hadn’t really heard of UNF before and don’t think I would have considered it an option. But then I made a lot of connections through NFHC, and was introduced to UNF’s program and realized it would be a better fit for me. I’m thankful for that! Also, I feel good about having connections at Baptist that will hopefully help me gain more experience while in nursing school.”

Sarah starts classes this month and will be completing the BSN program.

National Nurses Week: Tracy Claveau, RN, BAN

  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

In honor of National Nurses Week (May 6-12), join us in celebrating the many wonderful and invaluable nurses who work with and impact our programs!

WP_20150506_026Meet Tracy

Tracy is the resident nurse on the Coalition staff. She brings her expertise to her new position with the Fetal and Infant Mortality Review, which helps us improve health outcomes in the region. Below, she discusses her nursing career and the work she does with FIMR.

  • Name: Tracy Claveau
  • Title: Fetal & Infant Mortality Review Coordinator
  • Organization: Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition

“After graduating from nursing school with a Bachelor’s in Nursing, I was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the United States Air Force Nurse Corps, where I served for six years. I have worked in a very large OB clinic, medical, surgical, cardiac, pediatrics and was a hospital nursing supervisor. I left hospital nursing to work in Managed Care until our second child was born.

In 2007 I went to work the Bay, Franklin, Gulf Healthy Start Coalition as the FIMR Program Manager. I came to work as a consultant for the Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition one year ago, where I am currently the FIMR coordinator, in addition to reporting on and writing contracts.

As the FIMR coordinator I select 30 infant and fetal death cases per year from an average of 140 in the region. The cases are reviewed to identify issues and gaps in services that may have contributed to the death. Data is gathered from each case from sources such as prenatal, hospital, WIC and Healthy Start records; law enforcement; DCF; and medical examiner records when applicable. I compile the data and prepare for review after assuring it is de-identified.

Monthly, a multi-disciplinary case review team meets to review the cases and make recommendations for system changes. The recommendations are assembled and given to the a team of community leaders, called the Community Action Team, who take action on the recommendation. The process, including evaluating the actions taken on the recommendation, is evaluated for effectiveness and presented to the community in a number of ways.”

National Nurses Week: Grant Freiberg and Jackie Hanson, RNs, BSNs

  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

In honor of National Nurses Week (May 6-12), join us in celebrating the many wonderful and invaluable nurses who work with and impact our programs!

Rounds At the Grounds 2013-0326Meet Grant and Jackie

Former Preconception Peer Educators, these two Chamberlain College of Nursing graduates share how volunteering to improve preconception health while in school made a difference in their nursing career.

“When I started nursing school I had a fairly clear understanding of of my future and how I would interact with patients from various backgrounds and ethnicities. Although there are many challenges involved with caring for many different people from different walks of life, it is truly something that I love to do. The ability to change a life through education and compassion is what drives me to try my hardest every single day.

When I look back over my time in nursing school I can honestly say that one of the best experiences I had was having the opportunity to serve and work on various projects with the Northeast Florida Healthy Start Coalition. While a lot of knowledge was gained during clinical rotations and late hours of studying, most of my learning came from hands-on community involvement. Volunteering for the Coalition provided me the opportunity to work and develop programs that allowed me to further understand a different population than what I would typically see during school hours. Because of this opportunity, I have become more well-rounded as a professional and a person.

The tools that I learned and developed during my time as a PPE  are carried over into my nursing experience on a daily basis. I am more aware of the needs of my patients, whether it be providing a calming voice or the instituting proper follow-up care, solely by listening and learning from them. My goals are to provide information through education. I am truly grateful for my time with the Coalition as they helped me develop the skills required for my life as a professional.”

  • Name: Jackie Hanson
  • Title: Registered Nurse
  • Organization: Baptist Health

“I love being a nurse. Though most of the time stressful, it is a gratifying career.  I never truly realized how I touched peoples lives until I had a patient who sent me a wedding gift; a repeat patient who remembered I was getting married; the patients, though not mine on that current admission, say, “Hey there’s Jackie, she took care of me last time;” and those patients who ask to have me.  This is how I know I’m doing what I was meant to do.  I’m not only taking care of their body, I take care of their spirit as well.

The PPE program allowed me to educate college aged adults in my community the importance of preconception health and infant mortality while also being educated on the subject.  Also, being apart of Jacksonville Infant Mortality Alliance gave me the much needed confidence to speak in public. Not only did I talk to college students but I had the opportunity to interact with the community as well and spread the message of preconception health. The time I spent as a PPE/JIMA member has made me an overall better nurse. “