National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy

May 4, 2011  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

May 4th is the National Day to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

The National Day is organized by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy to bring attention to the both the strides made in reducing teen pregnancy rates and the importance of teens thinking carefully about sex, relationships, contraception, the possibility of pregnancy and the lifelong challenges of being a parent

Stayteen.org has a national day quiz and other activities for teens to participate in.

While the teen birth rate has declined nationwide and here in Florida, we still have a long way to go:

  • Teenagers, ages 15 to 19 years old who gave birth, represented 9.9 percent of all Northeast Florida births in 2009 but accounted for a higher proportion of poor health outcomes.
  • Mothers ages 19 and under were more likely than their older counterparts to experience fetal and infant deaths, receive late or no prenatal care and have pre-term and low birth weight babies.
  • Teen pregnancy has a significant economic impact on society. An analysis from the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy estimates that teen childbearing (ages 19 and under) in Florida costs taxpayers (federal, state, and local) at least $481 million in 2004. Most of the costs stemmed from public health care, child welfare, incarceration and lost tax revenue.
  • Daughters of teen mothers are more likely to become teen parents themselves and sons of teen mothers are more likely to be incarcerated.
  • Nearly one out of five teenagers in Northeast Florida who has a baby will become pregnant again before leaving her teens. Additional births multiply the difficulties experienced by teen mothers.

Task Force featured in news for teen focus group results

May 2, 2011  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

The NEFL Teen Pregnancy Task Force has been featured in the local news because of the results of several focus groups conducted around the region with teens that show they want a more holistic approach to sex education.

The focus groups have gained attention because the Baker County School Board will consider an abstinence-based sex education curriculum on Monday, May 2.

Read the Baker County Press story here.

Watch the Action News Jax coverage:

New Frontiers in Teacher Evaluation forum to take place May 4

Apr 29, 2011  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  1 comment

On May 4, the Jacksonville Public Education Fund and United Way are co-hosting a “New Frontiers in Teacher Evaluation,” a forum featuring national speakers on the issues of performance pay and value-added models.

Speakers include:

Keynote address: Rick Hess, American Enterprise Institute

Panel Discussion:

  • Moderator: Sarah Glover, Harvard University Strategic Data Project
  • Tracye Brown, Hillsborough Public Schools
  • Katie Micek, Jefferson County Public Schools (Colorado)

The event will run from 4pm to 6pm, with a reception from 6 to 7 pm. and will be in the Ann Hicks Auditorium at the Jacksonville Public Library..

The forum is open to the public Guests can register for the event here.

Coalition members, staff attend Children’s Campaign breakfast

Apr 27, 2011  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

“What’s Happening and What’s Next for Kids” was the theme of a legislative breakfast briefing held in Jacksonville April 27 by The Children’s Campaign. Campaign founder and president Roy Miller provided an update on legislative budget issues impacting children and challenged the 100 attendees to hold lawmakers accountable for proposed cuts in prevention, juvenile justice and education programs. State House and Senate conference committees begin meeting this week to finalize the 2011-2012 budget.

The non-partisan advocacy group focuses on an agenda of 5 Promises to Children. Promise 1 highlights maternal and child health care needs in the state, including Healthy Start, KidCare and access to prenatal care.

Coalition members Karen Wolfson, Joy Burgess and Jeff Goldhagen, and staff participated in the meeting. The briefing was sponsored by the Jessie Ball duPont Fund, the Community Foundation and the Chartrand Foundation.

How do Northeast Florida counties rank in health outcomes and factors?

Apr 25, 2011  •   Written by Erin Addington   •  no comments

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation released their annual County Health Rankings and Northeast Florida’s counties continue to show great disparities.

The rankings — which were developed for all the counties in the nation by the RWJF and University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute — are based on a model of population health that emphasizes that many factors contribute to the health of a community.

Here is how Northeast Florida fared compared to the rest of the state:

Baker: 62 of 67 counties in Health Outcomes, 50 of 67 in Health Factors

  • Positives: Higher HS graduation rate than the state, low violent crime rate
  • Negatives: High rates of premature death, smoking, obesity, teen births, preventable hospital stays and motor vehicle deaths; less access to healthy foods

Clay: 6 of 67 counties in Health Outcomes, 15 of 67 in Health Factors

  • Positives: High HS graduation rate and college attendance, lower rate of children in poverty
  • Negatives: High rates of smoking and obesity

Duval: 46 of 67 counties in Health Outcomes, 28 of 67 in Health Factors

  • Positives: Access to primary care providers, healthy foods
  • Negatives: High incidence of low birth weight babies, low HS graduation rate, high rates of teen births, violent crimes and premature deaths

Nassau: 31 of 67 counties in Health Outcomes, 21 of 67 in Health Factors

  • Positives: Higher HS graduation rate than the state, lower incidence of low birth weight babies
  • Negatives: High rates of obesity, teen births, violent crimes and premature deaths

St. Johns: 3 of 67 counties in Health Outcomes, 1 of 67 in Health Factors

  • Positives: Lower incidence of premature death and low birth weight babies, high HS graduation rate and college attendance
  • Negatives: High rate of excessive drinking, less access to healthy foods

How did your county do?