Nurse-Family Partnership

About

FDOH Duval nurse Franita Adams on a home visit with Kiriana Mathis and her son Fadale Jr.

Nurse-Family Partnership®  is an evidence-based, home-visiting model for pregnant women that is implemented within the Healthy Start program in Duval County. Services are provided to 200 high-risk, first-time mothers in several high-risk neighborhoods annually by specially trained nurses from the Florida Department of Health Duval County and UF Health Jacksonville.

To qualify for Nurse-Family Partnership®, a mom must:

  • Be less than 28 weeks (7 months) pregnant
  • Have no previous live births
  • Be at 200 percent of the poverty level or below (equivalent to the Medicaid eligibility requirement)
  • Live in one of the three counties where services are currently offered: Baker, Clay and Duval

The model has been identified as successfully impacting key outcomes in maternal and child health, child maltreatment, child development, school readiness, family socio-economic status and injuries, crime and domestic violence.

NFP family posing together at the 2019 Young, Fly and Fashionable – Family Experience event. Each year NFP has families strut their stuff on the runway at UF Health Jacksonville.

The Jacksonville NFP Project is part of Florida’s Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Program. Funding for the state’s MIECHV program was provided as part of the federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) through the Human Resources and Services Administration. The intent of the initiative is to equip parents and caregivers with the knowledge, skills and tools to assist their children in being healthy, safe and ready to succeed in school.

The NEFL Nurse-Family Partnership program, which began in 2008, has been recognized in the community and by the Nurse-Family Partnership National Service office for outstanding all-around performance and implementation of the model.

NFP was one of seven evidence-based models chosen by the state plan as eligible for funding and implementation.  The program evaluates success based on maternal and newborn health; child injuries; child abuse, neglect or mistreatment; reducing ER visits and domestic violence; family economic self-sufficiency;  and coordination and referrals for other community resources and support. Through the integration of behavioral and clinical health, NFP has established a referral process to additional resources for any program participants and primary caregivers who positively screen for depression, child developmental delays and intimate partner violence.

NFP is on the front lines of prevention efforts aimed at reducing maternal and child mortality and promotion healthier pregnancies and outcomes. 

 

From the Field: Nurse Family Partnership Success Stories